The LectureTools Blog

How I Use My iPad as a College Student and Educator

Posted by Chelsea Jenkins on Mon, September 24, 2012

2012 09 11 1331

I'm currently working on my post-baccalaureate degree in speech language pathology, and I also work around 40 hours a week as both a freelance writer and early literacy tutor. I rely heavily on technology to help me accomplish my academic and professional goals. I can't imagine life without it. My first college experience, in the late 90s, was much different from my current one. I used the computers in the school library to type up my papers, but that was the extent of how I used technology. Now I spend what seems like all day on my iPhone, iPad, and laptop.

Technology can definitely be a distraction at times, but it's mostly a lifesaver. I don't think I'd be able to work and study as effectively as I do without the help of my laptop and iPad. My iPad has been a particularly useful tool over the last couple of years. I use it in a million different ways in my day-to-day life. On an average day, here are some of the ways I use my iPad as a student, writer, and educator:

1. I check my class assignments on Blackboard while riding the subway to school to make sure I've completed them all. (I usually have).

2. I use my Evernote app to take notes in class and organize those notes. When I know a lecture is particularly important or just don't have the energy to take notes, I record what my professors are saying with a neat little app called Audiolio.

3. In between classes, I'll read eTextbooks for my courses. Unfortunately, not all my textbooks are available in eTextbook format. So, I do have to put my iPad aside every once in a while and crack open an old-fashioned book.

4. All of my classes are scheduled in the mornings. When I'm done with them I ride home on the subway and use my iPad to reply to emails from my editors/freelance supervisors. I also use Evernote to write out ideas I have for various writing projects.

5. I switch over to my laptop and complete writing assignments for work when I get home. Once I'm done, I'll usually spend some time on my iPad, going over my class notes for the day. I also frequently use my iPad to peruse SLP job postings. I'll be graduating this December, and I like to keep track of what sort of job openings there are.

6. At this point in my day, it's usually almost time to meet up with one of the kindergarten, first, or second grade students I tutor. I might call my boyfriend or one of my friends on the way to the subway to catch up and make dinner plans or other plans for the evening.

7. On the subway, I go over my lesson plan for whichever student I'll be meeting with that day.

8. I meet up with my student. We typically read and re-read a print book together and then read a fun, interactive book together on my iPad. This week I'm reading The Cat in the Hatwith all of my kids. This classic book totally comes alive on the iPad. If you have or teach young children, you have to check it out!

9. Oftentimes, I'll end the lesson with my students by playing some sort of literacy game on my iPad and practicing sight words on digital flashcards (on my iPad, of course). I typically use the ABC Pocket Phonics app with my kindergarten students to practice their letters and signs. And I'll use apps like Early Reader and K12 Timed Reading Practice Lite with my older kiddos to work on their fluency and more advanced phonics skills. The young learners I work with pretty much love everything we do on my iPad, and I truly believe all of them have benefited from using this technology.

10. Once I'm done tutoring, I usually take a break from my iPad. I plug it in, and leave it alone for a while. I might meet up with my boyfriend or friends for dinner and usually spend some time unwinding with them at the end of the day. Before bed, I might research different literacy and speech therapy apps. I get excited about all the cool apps I'll be able to use once I officially start working in speech therapy, and I drift off to sleep, oftentimes still holding my iPad.

As you can probably tell, I'm glued to my iPad and technology in general throughout the day. As a student or educator, how do you use your iPad to optimize what you do? Let us know!

 

Angelita Williams is a freelance writer, student, and educator who frequently contributes to onlinecollegecourses.com. She strives to instruct her readers and enrich their lives and welcomes you to contact her at angelita.williams7@gmail.com if you have any questions or comments.


 

Lecturing with an iPad eBook

Control Your Lecture with an iPad

Wander any place in your classroom and still control your slides! Download our free eBook and learn how to use your iPad to untether yourself from the podium and start teaching more interactively.

Topics: emerging technologies in education, interactive classroom technology, enhance student engagement, Teaching with Technology, Student-Instructor Interaction, Engaging Students in the Classroom, Educational Technology, instructor communication, student engagement, student engagement strategies, educational networking, Apple iPad in Education

Pros and Cons of iPads in the Classroom

Posted by Jason Aubrey on Tue, June 26, 2012

 

iPad Image resized 600

 

Since it debuted in 2010 the iPad has taken the world by storm. Tablets and e-readers have flooded the market from every manufacturer possible. People are regularly trading their laptops for the sleeker version of the tablet. Businesses are using them for presentations, meetings, and events. Basically, the iPad is saturating every market possible. So it should come as no surprise that it’s becoming a regular debate as to if iPads should be offered in classrooms or not. However there has been some controversy surrounding implementing iPads in classrooms, with some heavy pros and cons weighing on each side.

PROS

1. Eliminates the need for textbooks – Issuing students iPads at the beginning of the year virtually eliminates the need for textbooks in the classroom because of the ability to download books to the device. This means less money spent on books that are outdated within a few years, and less weight for students to lug back and forth from class to class and home and back every day. Plus, it’s easier for kids to highlight important information within the text and keep track of notes in the margins of pages. 

2. Organization – This all but eliminates the “dog ate my homework” excuse and is a viable solution for the chronically disorganized. Students’ notes are all in one place, homework can be uploaded into virtual dropboxes, and each subject can be confined into an individual desktop folder. 

3. Teaches kids early on about technology – Like it or not, technology is taking over the way we do everything, from personal interactions to business ones. The sooner kids learn how to not only be comfortable with using technology, but also be extremely proficient in it, the more it’s going to help them succeed later on in life. 

4. It allows teachers to give lectures in cutting edge ways – Instead of the typical approach to classroom lectures where teachers stand at the front of the classroom and talk for the duration of the class, a practice which tends to leave students less then engaged, iPads in the classroom allow for a much more interactive approach. Through the use of technology like LectureTools teachers and students alike experience in the classroom learning experience in an entirely different, more hands-on approach.

Cons

1. Expensive – Let’s face it, iPads aren’t cheap. Buying an iPad to be issued to every student and teacher would get expensive fast, and then there’s always the worry that a careless student would accidentally break one, or that the inevitable accident would happen leaving the iPad broken and useless and needing to be repaired or replaced. 

2. Potential to be very distracting – Having an iPad at your fingertips all day has the very tempting potential to be extremely distracting, especially if you’re one of the many kids who has some sort of attention disorder. There would have to be some sort of monitoring in place to ensure that students used the iPad solely for school purposes, and even then there are ways around that. 

3. Connectivity – Relying on a device that has to be connected to the internet to get the full functionality out of it is risky, to put it mildly. One network outage can throw off an entire day’s lessons, which is an attractive argument for the standard textbook approach.

It’s plausible, and even probable, that at some point iPads will be the standard in the classrooms. While there are still definite cons to the approach, they aren’t anything that can’t be dealt with, and the pros weigh heavy in favor of the switch to a tablet-based learning experience.

Author Bio

Melanie Slaugh is enthusiastic about the growing prospects and opportunities of various industries and writing articles on various consumer goods and services as a freelance writer. She writes extensively for internet service providers and also topics related to internet service providers in her area for presenting the consumers the information they need to choose the right Internet package for them. She can be reached at slaugh.slaugh907 @ gmail.com.


 

Lecturing with an iPad eBookLearn How to Teach with Your iPad

Students are far less likely to go off-task when you are able to roam the aisles. Download our free eBook and learn how to use your iPad to teach class from anywhere in the room and break free from the podium.

Topics: Mobile Devices for Education, emerging technologies in education, Educational Technology, student engagement, Apple iPad in Education

5 Ways to Use Your iPad to Teach in the College Classroom

Posted by Christopher Machielse on Tue, January 31, 2012

iPad
Photo credit: Sean MacEntee

When thinking of iPads in education, typically the first thought that comes to mind is an iPad for every student. But, iPads and their Android-based counterparts have plenty to offer the college classroom in the hands of instructors, too.

The tech savvy professor can finally teach without the need to spend the first ten minutes of class locating a working dry erase marker or achieving the seemingly impossible feat of configuring an overhead projector to project both large enough for students in the back to see, as well as in focus.

In many cases, the iPad enables you to interact more with large groups of students and facilitates more engaging means of instruction. Here are 5 ways to use the iPad as an instructor in higher education:

 

1. Control your laptop remotely

Some of the primary criticisms of the iPad are that it does not offer the same level of functionality as a laptop running either Windows or OSX.  The iPad does not allow you to multitask, nor does it offer an SD card slot or a USB port.

But, while teaching your class, you can control your laptop wirelessly using an iPad. This means you have access to the same applications that you do on your Mac or PC, and by controlling a laptop that is connected to the classroom projector, you can thus navigate and project your class PowerPoint slides using your iPad.

 

2. Present interactive activities to your students

Admittedly there isn’t too much advantage to simply using a remote desktop app like Splashtop or LogMeIn if all you are doing is advancing PowerPoint slides – remotes for this already exist, and they are substantially cheaper (and smaller) than iPads.

Take the opportunity to stop lecturing at your students and start engaging them. Present interactive activities, like free response questions, using your tablet, so that your students can engage with the material you are presenting to them. They’ll pay more attention, too.

 

 3. Open a backchannel and reply to questions

One of the worst things about teaching a large lecture course is that oftentimes it is difficult to know if students understand anything you say. Additionally, students can be too intimidated to raise hands in front of their peers, or simply don’t have a chance to ask a question without interrupting.

There are many methods to open a backchannel for your classroom using your iPad, some more elegant than others. Browse forums or a chat room built into your LMS with your iPad while continuing to present lecture slides using the podium PC and a presentation remote. Or, adopt a more seamless interactive presentation tool.

 

4. Draw or annotate your slides

It’s tough to draw diagrams or graphs using a mouse. Use your electronic slate to draw on your slides using your finger or, better yet, a stylus.

When remotely controlling your PC using your tablet, you should have no trouble drawing graphs or sketching out important points. No more need to bring a package of wet erase markers and a box of overhead transparencies!

 

5. Catch off-task students by roaming the aisles

sleeping studentAt times it can be tough to engage students when you stand guard next to the lectern for the entire class session to access a mouse and keyboard. But, when you have a remote connection configured using your iPad, you can easily walk up and down the aisles of the lecture hall.

This will inevitably wake up students who thought the distance between you and the seating area represented an impenetrable fortress of safe space for an early-morning nap, and lets you see which students are actually typing comments on their friends’ Facebook albums instead of notes on your course.

 

Lecturing with an iPad eBookFree eBook: Lecturing with an iPad

Students are far less likely to stray when you are able to roam the aisles. Download our free eBook and learn how to use your iPad to untether yourself from the podium and start teaching more interactively.

Topics: Apple, classroom engagement strategies, emerging technologies in education, interactive classroom technology, Teaching with Technology, Student-Instructor Interaction, Engaging Students in the Classroom, Classroom Response Systems, Educational Technology, student engagement, student engagement strategies, Student Response Systems, Apple iPad in Education

2011: The Year of Ed Tech

Posted by Erin Klein on Thu, January 26, 2012

students using ipads in the classroom

The year 2012 holds a lot of promise for the field of education technology—but before we take the leap into the future, we should take a moment to reflect on the outstanding accomplishments of the past. It's equally important to emphasize why improvements in education are notable in the first place. Increasing the public's accessibility to educational resources, be they classroom-based or otherwise, is the most effective way to improve the quality of education in the U.S. and lead to a more productive society as a result.

 

The reign of the iPad

According to the New York Times, 2011 saw a growing number of schools begin to integrate use of the iPad into curriculum as a means of improving student understanding and engagement in the classroom. The devices are used for various academic pursuits, including analyzing literature through multimedia, playing trivia-based games in history class, and walking through complex math problems with step-by-step animation. Interactive platforms allow students to take a more hands-on approach to the problems that confront them at school.

 

Adult learning through mobile devices

Even more accessible and convenient than the iPad, mobile devices were also a notable medium for educational breakthroughs in 2011. Many colleges and universities across the country began encouraging adult learning through mobile devices last year taking advantage of the potential of podcasts as a means of broadcasting online lectures and videos through mobile technology

 

Shift in opinion regarding online education

Though the public may not be quick to catch on, over half of college presidents surveyed by the Pew Research Center reported a positive opinion of the value of online education (pdf link). This is compared to just 29 percent of the general public mentioned. Despite a less positive opinion toward the value of online education, its popularity has continued to grow in the past ten years, with 46 percent of graduates reporting to have taken at least one online class during their time spent in college.

 

steve jobsRemembering Steve Jobs

No article discussing the breakthroughs in education technology would be complete without referencing the contributions of Steve Jobs. Although his life was cut short in October of last year, he left an enduring legacy. Jobs was one of the first innovators to advocate the use of computers in the classroom, and his devotion to integrating technology into educational environments was clear with each new device Apple manufactured. The use of laptops, iPads, mobile devices and other technological devices in the classroom can be traced back to the convictions of one man.

 

The Year of Ed Tech

2012 promises to be a year of digital dominance as well, with products like ultrabooks and tablets taking center stage this month. But 2011 was a year that created a platform for bigger and better educational technology to come.

 

Photo credit: Fancy Jantzi


Jesse Langley specializes in writing about education, professional and personal development, and career building. He writes on behalf of Colorado Technical University.

Topics: Mobile Devices for Education, Online Education, Apple, Steve Jobs, Apple iPad in Education

5 Reasons Why Apple's New iBooks Will Modernize the eTextbook

Posted by Christopher Machielse on Fri, January 20, 2012

apple ibooks textbooks

Yesterday, Apple made a series of education announcements at the Guggenheim Museum. Perhaps the largest news of the day was the unveiling of the iBooks 2 eTextbook format, designed to harness the 1.5 million iPads currently used for education (and to make it even more appealing to get more iPads into the hands of students).

There are plenty of companies vying for eTextbook dollars, but none with as much weight and digital delivery infrastructure already in place as Apple. Here’s why iBooks 2 are a wave capable of making a huge splash in higher education:

 

1. iBooks are significantly cheaper than physical textbooks

While the catalog is currently limited, Apple has a price cap of $14.99 on books selling in its store. Despite not having the ability to resell an eTextbook, the difference in price between iBooks and traditional paper copies is large enough to draw in more students who are looking to save on books, particularly those who either already own an iPad, or those who attend institutions with iPad initiatives.

 

2. Anyone can create and distribute materials through iTunes

Along with the iBooks 2 format, Apple also revealed the iBook Author application. Anyone can import existing Keynote or Word files, and it is simple to drag and drop multimedia into your iBook. For instructors who offer a great deal of material in either a coursepack or in a custom textbook, the iBook Author application will allow them to publish their book to the iTunes Store in no time, with the ability to price materials from $14.99 and under.

 

3. Designed for the iPad, iBooks are more engaging and interactive

Most eTextbooks to date are identical to their physical counterparts, the only difference being that the former is accessible only through laptops or other mobile devices. iBooks by nature are intended to be optimized experiences for the iPad. This means that beyond standard fare – text and still photos – videos, interactive quizzes, and other elements can supplement static material.

 

4. No need to worry about writing in your book

When students read an iBook, they are able to add “sticky notes” to particular pages with notes for later. They can also highlight important passages using an array of different virtual “ink” colors. This could have the effect of getting more students to “mark up” their class reading, since there is no need to worry about ink bleeding through pages, or reduced resale value from taking notes in the book.

 

5. A single location for all course materials

With web browsing, office suites, and a full range of apps already available for the iPad, the addition of proper textbooks provides a single location for students’ study materials. There is need to tote around multiple books, notebooks, and highlighters when everyone is contained within a single device. To this effect, Apple has updated iTunes U to also allow instructors to deliver syllabi, assignments, and information like office hours through a dedicated app.

 

Improve In-Class Engagement and Attentiveness Using Students’ iPads

student ipad appWhile iBooks and iTunes U provide great platforms for after class, did you know that by engaging iPads during class, students can become more attentive and engaged? Using the LectureTools iPad App, students can take notes associated with lecture slides, respond to interactive activities, and relay comprehension difficulties to you in real-time.

Get Early Access to the LectureTools Student iPad App

Topics: eTextbooks, Apple, emerging technologies in education, Teaching with Technology, Educational Technology, student engagement, ipad application, Apple iPad in Education