LectureTools User Blog

Supplements of a LectureTools Testimony

Posted by Chelsea Jenkins on Tue, Oct 30, 2012 @ 12:10 PM

LectureTools: An engaging presentation tool to use in the classroom

Jim Barbour, associate professor of economics, uses LectureTools in his introductory-level courses.

Jim Barbour, chair of the economics department and associate professor of economics, uses LectureTools in his introductory-level courses.

While searching for an alternative to clickers to use in his classes, Jim Barbour, chair of the economics department and associate professor of economics, stumbled upon LectureTools.

Run by a five-person team in Ann Arbor, Mich.,LectureTools is an engaging, web-based program that allows instructors to create interactive presentations.

“I was looking for something that was more robust,” Barbour said. “Think of [LectureTools] as a combination of clickers, Facebook and Twitter all rolled into one.”

Special Features

By uploading preexisting PowerPoint presentations to LectureTools, instructors can enhance classroom materials by incorporating multiple-choice, short-answer or ordering questions, as well as images and videos onto slides. Students can access presentations on their own devices by logging in to the program.

“All of this is like a clicker on steroids,” Barbour said. “But now, you don’t have to keep track of the clickers, and you don’t have to charge them up.”

Instructors can incorporate multiple-choice, short-answer or ordering questions, as well as images and videos onto slides.

Instructors can enhance classroom materials by incorporating multiple-choice, short-answer or ordering questions, as well as images and videos onto slides.

LectureTools is free for instructors, Barbour said, while students must pay a flat $15 fee at the beginning of the semester.

LectureTools works best on laptops, tablets and smartphones, Barbour said, though students can still participate if he or she has a mobile phone with texting capabilities.

Barbour said out of the seventy-odd students he has had in his LectureTools-based classes, only one did not have a laptop, tablet, smartphone or phone with texting capabilities. Because of this, Barbour is lending his Kindle to the student.

“There are places [students can] checkout [laptops] from the school, so I’ve run into that once out of 74 students,” Barbour said. “It’s probably going to be a problem less and less as we go forward.”

Students can control the view of their individual screens, take notes on slides, mark slides as confusing, bookmark slides to review later and direct questions to instructors by typing inquiries into a comment box.

 

 

Students can control the view of their individual screens, take notes on slides, mark slides as confusing, bookmark slides to review later and direct questions to instructors by typing inquiries into a comment box.

 

 

While logged in to LectureTools, students can control the view of their individual screens. Students can take notes on the slides, and because the program is web-based, students’ notes are saved online and can be accessed later.

Freshman Michelle Rich, a student in Barbour’s introductory-level economics class, said she likes the flexibility of LectureTools in that it allows her to control what slide is displayed on her screen. She said she likes the interactivity of the technology too, because it helps her to better learn the material.

“LectureTools is helpful, but I am still adapting to this new way of learning,” she said. “I really like how my professor asks us questions through LectureTools because it tests us while we’re learning.”

Students can mark presentation slides as confusing, and they can bookmark slides to review later. Further, students can direct questions to instructors by typing them into a comment box, and professors receive those inquiries instantly.

“It’s another way for me to communicate with the class, and that’s really what I’m interested in because at the core, we are storytelling creatures,” Barbour said. “This allows me to tailor the story as I go to match what the class seems to need. Any good instructor always does that.”

LectureTools records all student activity and converts the data into a report, which is sent to an instructor approximately 20 minutes after class is over.

Students in Barbour's economics class collaborate on a short-answer question.

 

 

Students in Barbour's introductory-level economics class collaborate on a short-answer question.

 

 

 

By Sam Parker 

 

To use LectureTools and start increasing engagement in YOUR classroom click here: 

 

 

 

 

Topics: LectureTools News, classroom engagement strategies, emerging technologies in education, interactive classroom technology, enhance student engagement, Teaching with Technology, Student-Instructor Interaction, Engaging Students in the Classroom, Large Class, Classroom Response Systems, Educational Technology, instructor interaction, instructor communication, student engagement, student engagement strategies, Student Response Systems, Student Participation, student response, Flipped Instruction, Clickers, educational networking, Guest Blogger

How to Flip Your Class with LectureTools!

Posted by Katherine Pfeiffer on Wed, Feb 22, 2012 @ 06:02 AM
Are you being dragged kicking and screaming into the 21st Century, or are you dancing with joy when you find a new and cool education technology?

Either way, LectureTools offers a fantastic and easy solution to flip your classroom.  Some of you may ask what I mean by flipping a classroom, check out my last blog: The Flipped Classroom: Teaching and Learning in the 21st Century

Have you been thinking about how to flip your classroom?  Are you not sure what technology to use?  Let’s take a look at how LectureTools can help support your flipped classroom.

lecturetools flipped classroom

LectureTools is an interactive student response system.  It was designed to connect instructors with students in a synchronous face-to-face interactive environment.  However, take a new technology like LectureTools mixed with bright innovative teachers, and, voila!  You have an awesome and easy way to FLIP YOUR CLASS TODAY!

You may ask “what is so special about LectureTools?”

LectureTools offers everything the instructor needs to present materials to their students for a flipped class. 

  • EMBEDDED VIDEO - With the ability to embed both native (your own recorded video) and YouTube videos directly into the lecture slides students can seamlessly review their lecture, video clip to slides, then back to video clips.
  • ORGANIZED NOTE-TAKING - LectureTools also offers a very organized place for students to type their notes along side the lecture slides.  This keeps everything together in one neat place.
  • INTERACTIVE ACTIVITIES - LectureTools was designed to be an interactive student response system, so there are interactive activities that the instructor can insert to test the students’ understanding as they are going through their lecture.  Teachers can assess any misconceptions and address them in the next in class session.  These interactive activities are multiple-choice question, free response answer, re-ordered quiz, and our all-time favorite, the image quiz.
  • QUESTION & ANSWER INTERFACE - Finally, one of the greatest features that LectureTools offers both students and instructors is the question interface.  As students sit in their lecture (whether real time or synchronous) they may type in questions to their instructors.  All questions will be answered and shared anonymously with the entire class.  This is the virtual way of raising your hand and hoping to be called on, however in this format students’ questions can always be recognized.

Sign on to see what my flipped lecture of the study of the cell looks like:

Go to: https://my.lecturetools.com/ and use the following credentials:

email address: icon20@lecturetools.com

password: icon2011

 

 

 

 

 

Topics: emerging technologies in education, interactive classroom technology, Teaching with Technology, Student-Instructor Interaction, Engaging Students in the Classroom, Classroom Response Systems, Educational Technology, Student Response Systems, Flipped Instruction, Laptops in Education, The Flipped Classroom, Cloud Computing, Using Multimedia During Class