LectureTools User Blog

Supplements of a LectureTools Testimony

Posted by Chelsea Jenkins on Tue, Oct 30, 2012 @ 12:10 PM

LectureTools: An engaging presentation tool to use in the classroom

Jim Barbour, associate professor of economics, uses LectureTools in his introductory-level courses.

Jim Barbour, chair of the economics department and associate professor of economics, uses LectureTools in his introductory-level courses.

While searching for an alternative to clickers to use in his classes, Jim Barbour, chair of the economics department and associate professor of economics, stumbled upon LectureTools.

Run by a five-person team in Ann Arbor, Mich.,LectureTools is an engaging, web-based program that allows instructors to create interactive presentations.

“I was looking for something that was more robust,” Barbour said. “Think of [LectureTools] as a combination of clickers, Facebook and Twitter all rolled into one.”

Special Features

By uploading preexisting PowerPoint presentations to LectureTools, instructors can enhance classroom materials by incorporating multiple-choice, short-answer or ordering questions, as well as images and videos onto slides. Students can access presentations on their own devices by logging in to the program.

“All of this is like a clicker on steroids,” Barbour said. “But now, you don’t have to keep track of the clickers, and you don’t have to charge them up.”

Instructors can incorporate multiple-choice, short-answer or ordering questions, as well as images and videos onto slides.

Instructors can enhance classroom materials by incorporating multiple-choice, short-answer or ordering questions, as well as images and videos onto slides.

LectureTools is free for instructors, Barbour said, while students must pay a flat $15 fee at the beginning of the semester.

LectureTools works best on laptops, tablets and smartphones, Barbour said, though students can still participate if he or she has a mobile phone with texting capabilities.

Barbour said out of the seventy-odd students he has had in his LectureTools-based classes, only one did not have a laptop, tablet, smartphone or phone with texting capabilities. Because of this, Barbour is lending his Kindle to the student.

“There are places [students can] checkout [laptops] from the school, so I’ve run into that once out of 74 students,” Barbour said. “It’s probably going to be a problem less and less as we go forward.”

Students can control the view of their individual screens, take notes on slides, mark slides as confusing, bookmark slides to review later and direct questions to instructors by typing inquiries into a comment box.

 

 

Students can control the view of their individual screens, take notes on slides, mark slides as confusing, bookmark slides to review later and direct questions to instructors by typing inquiries into a comment box.

 

 

While logged in to LectureTools, students can control the view of their individual screens. Students can take notes on the slides, and because the program is web-based, students’ notes are saved online and can be accessed later.

Freshman Michelle Rich, a student in Barbour’s introductory-level economics class, said she likes the flexibility of LectureTools in that it allows her to control what slide is displayed on her screen. She said she likes the interactivity of the technology too, because it helps her to better learn the material.

“LectureTools is helpful, but I am still adapting to this new way of learning,” she said. “I really like how my professor asks us questions through LectureTools because it tests us while we’re learning.”

Students can mark presentation slides as confusing, and they can bookmark slides to review later. Further, students can direct questions to instructors by typing them into a comment box, and professors receive those inquiries instantly.

“It’s another way for me to communicate with the class, and that’s really what I’m interested in because at the core, we are storytelling creatures,” Barbour said. “This allows me to tailor the story as I go to match what the class seems to need. Any good instructor always does that.”

LectureTools records all student activity and converts the data into a report, which is sent to an instructor approximately 20 minutes after class is over.

Students in Barbour's economics class collaborate on a short-answer question.

 

 

Students in Barbour's introductory-level economics class collaborate on a short-answer question.

 

 

 

By Sam Parker 

 

To use LectureTools and start increasing engagement in YOUR classroom click here: 

 

 

 

 

Topics: LectureTools News, classroom engagement strategies, emerging technologies in education, interactive classroom technology, enhance student engagement, Teaching with Technology, Student-Instructor Interaction, Engaging Students in the Classroom, Large Class, Classroom Response Systems, Educational Technology, instructor interaction, instructor communication, student engagement, student engagement strategies, Student Response Systems, Student Participation, student response, Flipped Instruction, Clickers, educational networking, Guest Blogger

4 Types of Image Quizzes to Get Your Students Thinking Critically

Posted by Christopher Machielse on Mon, Mar 26, 2012 @ 06:03 AM

Wondering more about the image quiz activity type inside of LectureTools? Here are four ways to use these activities that might fit in with your class:

 

Test for Understanding with Basic Identification Questions

basic identification image quizBasic recall questions are great for checking whether your students remember important information they will need going forward. These types of questions are related to multiple choice questions written to test vocabulary or recollection of simple facts. In the image quiz context, students would be presented with an image and would simply have to click on the point representing the correct answer.

A biology class might quiz students on where the nucleoid is in a diagram of a cell, while a history or geography class might quiz students on which country the Netherlands is on a blank map. This allows you to make sure students are remembering key information that is essential for new material that requires students to build on "old" material.

 

Encourage Critical Thinking with Multi-Dimensional Questions

Unlike basic identification questions, multi-dimensional image quizzes require students to do more than recall certain pieces of information. Instead, these questions have students engage with material in class that requires them to identify the appropriate concept and apply it to a problem they have never seen before.

Asking students in a biology class where in the cell ATP is produced, for example, may require them to remember both that mitochondria produce this energy as well as where they can find a mitochondrion in a cell. In a class about weather, showing students an aerial image and asking them where they would expect temperatures to be the hottest requires them to understand what conditions cause hotter surface temperatures to make an educated guess. These questions are more conceptual in nature, and are a great way to test whether students are making the bridge between reading information in a textbook and being able to apply it to a variety of situations.

 

Spark Discussion with Spectrum Questions

Open your class up to spectrum of possibilities, rather than confining it to a predetermined set of multiple choice answers. Spectrums can range from a simple strongly-agree-to-strongly-disagree scale to more philosophical or theoretical spectrums specifically drawn from course material.

spectrum questionWe’ve already written about how Mika LaVaque-Manty, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan, uses LectureTools to pose questions geared towards humanities. Most notably, he used the image quiz feature to present a timeline to his students and ask them, in their opinion, when the United States became a democracy. The question generated a discussion, as some students chose important historical dates like the Emancipation Proclamation, women’s suffrage, or the Civil Rights Act. Other students indicated that the US had not yet achieved this ideal. Open-ended questions such as these force students to think on their own and to develop arguments for a wide portfolio of choices. Spectrum questions have no correct answer, but rather, force students to think critically in the context of your course. They are also great for preparing students for exams with open-ended essay prompts.

 

Introduce New Concepts with In-Class Experiments

Student response systems need not only test students’ knowledge. They can also introduce brand new concepts like regression. A blank set of axes with two defined variables makes for a great image quiz question, as students can plot their data point. The results of the activity would then be the aggregation of the entire class’s data, which could be a good way to introduce regression as a way to measure correlation by drawing a line of best fit and labeling the β and error terms.

 

Have another idea for image quiz questions? Leave your idea in the comments!

 

making the switch ebookMaking the Switch: How 4 Professors at Michigan Embraced Laptops and Made Class Interactive

Download our free ebook to learn how professors at the University of Michigan are using LectureTools, an interactive presentation tool, to provide an in-class learning platform for student laptops.

Get the eBook

Topics: classroom engagement strategies, interactive classroom technology, Teaching with Technology, Student-Instructor Interaction, Engaging Students in the Classroom, Classroom Response Systems, Educational Technology, instructor interaction, student engagement, Student Response Systems, Student Participation, Clickers, image-based questions

How to Flip Your Class with LectureTools!

Posted by Katherine Pfeiffer on Wed, Feb 22, 2012 @ 06:02 AM
Are you being dragged kicking and screaming into the 21st Century, or are you dancing with joy when you find a new and cool education technology?

Either way, LectureTools offers a fantastic and easy solution to flip your classroom.  Some of you may ask what I mean by flipping a classroom, check out my last blog: The Flipped Classroom: Teaching and Learning in the 21st Century

Have you been thinking about how to flip your classroom?  Are you not sure what technology to use?  Let’s take a look at how LectureTools can help support your flipped classroom.

lecturetools flipped classroom

LectureTools is an interactive student response system.  It was designed to connect instructors with students in a synchronous face-to-face interactive environment.  However, take a new technology like LectureTools mixed with bright innovative teachers, and, voila!  You have an awesome and easy way to FLIP YOUR CLASS TODAY!

You may ask “what is so special about LectureTools?”

LectureTools offers everything the instructor needs to present materials to their students for a flipped class. 

  • EMBEDDED VIDEO - With the ability to embed both native (your own recorded video) and YouTube videos directly into the lecture slides students can seamlessly review their lecture, video clip to slides, then back to video clips.
  • ORGANIZED NOTE-TAKING - LectureTools also offers a very organized place for students to type their notes along side the lecture slides.  This keeps everything together in one neat place.
  • INTERACTIVE ACTIVITIES - LectureTools was designed to be an interactive student response system, so there are interactive activities that the instructor can insert to test the students’ understanding as they are going through their lecture.  Teachers can assess any misconceptions and address them in the next in class session.  These interactive activities are multiple-choice question, free response answer, re-ordered quiz, and our all-time favorite, the image quiz.
  • QUESTION & ANSWER INTERFACE - Finally, one of the greatest features that LectureTools offers both students and instructors is the question interface.  As students sit in their lecture (whether real time or synchronous) they may type in questions to their instructors.  All questions will be answered and shared anonymously with the entire class.  This is the virtual way of raising your hand and hoping to be called on, however in this format students’ questions can always be recognized.

Sign on to see what my flipped lecture of the study of the cell looks like:

Go to: https://my.lecturetools.com/ and use the following credentials:

email address: icon20@lecturetools.com

password: icon2011

 

 

 

 

 

Topics: emerging technologies in education, interactive classroom technology, Teaching with Technology, Student-Instructor Interaction, Engaging Students in the Classroom, Classroom Response Systems, Educational Technology, Student Response Systems, Flipped Instruction, Laptops in Education, The Flipped Classroom, Cloud Computing, Using Multimedia During Class

New Polling Controls Tailor Activities to Your Teaching Style

Posted by Christopher Machielse on Tue, Jan 3, 2012 @ 10:01 AM

Not every in-class activity needs to be presented in the same way. Our new activity slides integrate the question and the polling results. 

multiple choice slide

This eliminates the need to have an activity and its responses show up as two separate slides in the slide carousel. 

activity revised carousel

The Finish button acts like the previous interface’s “Show Results” button. Pressing it closes polling, makes the results visible, and displays the correct answer. But you can also control each of these functions individually using the expanded suite of controls. 

new polling controls

On each activity slide, you are able to control whether polling is open, whether results are shown, and whether the correct answer is identified.

This means you now have the flexibility, for example, to keep polling open while displaying the results in real-time. Or to close polling and move on to the next slide without revealing the answer. 

Alternatively, you have the option of pressing Reset to erase all student responses and switch to the initial question view. This would allow you to repoll students without creating a duplicate activity.

As an added bonus, the slides better handle multiple choice questions with many choices and the responses to free response questions for both you and your students. 

student view free response results

 

Add a Question to Your Lecture Today to Try the New Activity Slides

LectureTools Instructor Dashboard

Login or create an account to make your lecture more engaging with an interactive activity. Choose from multiple choice, ordered list, free response, and image quiz activities.

Create an Interactive Activity

Topics: LectureTools News, New Features, interactive classroom technology, Classroom Response Systems, Educational Technology, Student Response Systems, Student Participation

Introducing Expanded Slide View for Students

Posted by Christopher Machielse on Fri, Oct 14, 2011 @ 08:10 AM

One area where desktops have a distinct advantage over laptops is display area. Most laptops have displays that range from 13-16 inches, making every pixel that much more valuable. For students using LectureTools, there is often little need to access Course Tabs or the Lecture Dates Sidebar once class has started.

This fact combined with some of our student users’ requests for a way to zoom-in on slides inspired our newest feature: Expanded View.

 

Maximizing screen real estate for the things that matter

Students can now utilize more of their valuable screen real estate on the Student Notebook and the Slides or Question Tab. This makes it easier to read smaller type on the slides, and also allows a greater portion of laptop screens to be dedicated to in-class content and activities.

It’s as simple as clicking the expand view button on the lower right corner of the slides.

updated slides pane

The new button is integrated into the slides toolbox students are already familiar with.

 

full window expanded view

In Expanded View, the Lecture Dates Sidebar collapses and all top navigation is minimized. This maximizes the screen space for the slides, student questions, and notebook, allowing students to see a larger, “zoomed-in” version of the slides.

 

Returning to the standard view with all of the Course Tabs and top navigation links is as simple as pressing the Exit Expanded View button.

 

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Follow LectureTools on Twitter and join the latest conversations about emerging educational technologies, best practices for teaching with technology, and connect with educators around the world.

 

Topics: LectureTools News, New Features, emerging technologies in education, interactive classroom technology, Educational Technology, Student Response Systems, Web Applications, Student Note-Taking

How to Get the Best Results with LectureTools

Posted by Christopher Machielse on Fri, Aug 5, 2011 @ 09:08 AM

LectureTools has been designed with input from students and instructors to make class more engaging and to increase student attentiveness. To achieve the best results, however, quality pedagogy is essential.

When teaching new technologies, it is important to keep student learning in mind. Technology is only a tool – new instructional technology can give you more knives in the drawer, but you are still the chef.

A University of Michigan Center for Research on Learning and Teaching study (PDF link) identified several “good” instructional practices that are supported through use of LectureTools, including frequent assessment of student learning, teaching with a rapid feedback cycle, and reflection on learning.

Three Levels of LectureTools Use by Faculty

The CRLT study used faculty interviews and student feedback to code how each course was taught. Researchers found that LectureTools use fell into three distinct categories:

  1. Presentation: Instructor uploads slides and presents information while students take notes.
  2. Interaction: Instructor uploads slides and then presents information, polls students using the integrated student response system, and utilized the student inquiry tool.
  3. Reflection: Instructor not only presents information in slides and asks questions, but also modifies the lecture based on student responses, reflects on class responses, and uses questions or responses for group work or class activities.

Wieman has argued that interactive teaching improves student learning, and the three categories of LectureTools can easily be ordered from least interactive (Presentation) to most (Reflection).

Differences in Engagement, Attentiveness, and Learning by Teaching Style

After categorizing each course into the appropriate level of use, the researchers compared student perceptions of attentiveness, engagement, and learning.

 

Identified Perceptions of Levels

  Attentiveness increased due to LectureTools LectureTools helped me to be engaged Learned more due to LectureTools
Reflection
n=127
3.67* 3.83* 3.62*
Interaction
n=93
3.39* 3.51* 3.49*
Presentation
n=32
2.48 2.69 2.38

*Significant difference versus Presentation level classes with p<.001
1=significantly decreased, 5=significantly increased

 

Unsurprisingly, the data reveals that students in both interactive and reflective courses are significantly more attentive and engaged than their peers in presentation-based courses. Additionally, these students feel that they have learned more.

Conclusion and Best Practices

The CRLT study reveals that the more instructors take advantage of the interactive features of LectureTools, the more students feel they are much more engaged and attentive during class.

To achieve best results with LectureTools, it is important to use the interactive activities and the student inquiry channel. To move your class into the "Reflection" level use the activity results and student questions to help shape the lecture, facilitate peer instruction during and after activities, and spend time talking about student responses.

 

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Topics: classroom engagement strategies, emerging technologies in education, interactive classroom technology, Teaching with Technology, Student-Instructor Interaction, Engaging Students in the Classroom, Classroom Response Systems, Educational Technology, instructor interaction, instructor communication, student engagement, student engagement strategies, Student Response Systems, Laptops in Education, Learning Outcomes